2.4. Job Hazard Analysis Control Plan

1. RESPONSIBILITY 

Management is required to provide leadership in establishing and maintaining our policy in conducting job hazard analysis with involvement of associates and the safety committee.

Human resources/safety supervisor is to monitor activities and results.

2. SELECTING JOBS FOR ANALYSIS

Job Hazard Analysis can be performed on all jobs (routine or non-routine).  Which jobs should be analyzed?

1.where injury and/or illness occurred 

2. where safety concerns or close calls happened

3. new jobs or where changes where made 

4. jobs designated for analysis by the ergonomics management program

3. INVOLVING EMPLOYEES

•Involve the employee in all phases of analysis.

•Communicate the purpose.

•Inform the safety committee of planned activities and results.

•Communicate results to all associates by posting results.

4. GUIDELINES FOR CONDUCTING THE JOB HAZARD ANALYSIS

•Take a look at the general conditions under which the job is performed and develop a checklist.

•Pictures of the job can help make more detailed analysis of the work environment.

5. BREAKING DOWN THE JOB INTO TASK STEPS

•Break down jobs into steps.

•List each step.

•Observe employee performing the job and record enough information to describe each job (but do not make it too detailed). 

•When completed, go over the job steps with the employee.

6. IDENTIFYING HAZARDS

•Examine each step of the job to determine the hazards that exist or that might occur.

•Determine existing hazardous conditions which could cause injury or are potentially dangerous to the associate or cause injury to others.

7. EVAULATING HAZARDS

•Establish what events could lead to an injury or illness for each hazard identified. 

•Recommendations are based on the reliability of the solution.  Generally, the most reliable protection is to eliminate the source or cause of the hazard.

•Compare findings with similar jobs in the operation to increase effectiveness of reducing hazards. 

•Consider redesigning equipment, installing new components, changing tools, job rotation, installing ventilation, adding machine guards, etc.

•If hazards cannot be eliminated, the danger should be reduced as much as possible. 

•Changes should be accompanied by training programs.

8. RECOMMENDING SAFE PROCEDURE

•Review hazards with employee concerned and determine whether the job could be performed in another way.

•Consider changing the job sequence, using safety equipment, training, job rotation or modification of equipment.

•If safer and better job steps can be used, list each step and describe the new method.